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Left: David Pankenier, professor of Chinese, studies how the Chinese understood the sky and how early astrology manifested itself in different cultures.
Research Overview, Research Matters: Creating Knowledge that Benefits Society and the World

Lehigh offers an intellectually stimulating environment where researchers bring the highest level of scholarship to all the work they do on behalf of the university, their disciplines and society.

The character and content of research at Lehigh is shaped by the grand challenges facing our evolving planet. Lehigh researchers have a deep engagement with the world and work to advance knowledge that is relevant to today's society. They ask vital questions in order to find viable answers and bring new, enlightening perspectives to their work.

Lehigh strives to provide scholars with an environment that facilitates open dialogue and meaningful exchange. We value human interaction; encouraging faculty, staff and students from disparate fields of study to work side-by-side and share knowledge with fellow scholars. We support the kind of interdisciplinary exchange that sparks surprising insights and helps address the multidimensional problems of the 21st century.

 

Pictured above:
Left: David Pankenier, professor of Chinese, studies how the Chinese understood the sky and how early astrology manifested itself in different cultures.
Middle: The College of Education is working on an educational initiative in Paarl, South Africa, focused on primary and secondary schools.
Right: Mayuresh Kothare, professor of chemical engineering, is one of four researchers helping people learn to use brain-computer interface technology to regain control of functions they have lost due to brain damage or disease.

faculty profile

SHIN-YI CHOU, Ph.D.
SHIN-YI CHOU, Ph.D.

Associate professor, Economics
Ph.D.:
Economics, Duke University, 1986
Undergraduate: National Taiwan University

Shin-Yi Chou recently co-authored the largest study of its kind linking fast-food ads during children's shows to our nation's childhood obesity epidemic. Chou found that a ban on fast-food television advertisements during children's programming would reduce the number of overweight children ages 3-11 by 18 percent, while also lowering the number of overweight adolescents ages 12-18 by 14 percent.

The authors also question whether such a high degree of government involvement-and the costs of implementing such policies-is a practical option. Currently, Sweden, Norway and Finland are the only countries to have banned commercial sponsorship of children's programs.

 

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