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Selected Media Coverage: May 18, 2006

Denied by Princeton, Embraced by Harvard; U. of Penn Education Dean Is New President of Columbia U.
05/19/2006 - Chronicle of Higher Education, The (cir. 100,000)

College Transfer Rates Skyrocket
05/10/2006 - Voice of America (cir. )

Checks on Internal Controls Pay Off
05/08/2006 - Wall Street Journal, The (cir. 2,049,786)

Research: Executive Summaries
05/01/2006 - Industrial Engineer (cir. 28,279)

Spring Admissions Watch .. "Most Difficult Year Ever"
05/01/2006 - College Bound News (cir. )

Slim Fast
05/01/2006 - Allure (cir. 1,016,324)


Denied by Princeton, Embraced by Harvard; U. of Penn Education Dean Is New President of Columbia U.
05/19/2006 - Chronicle of Higher Education, The (cir. 100,000)



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REBOUND: It never feels good to be rejected, and Sean Dorrance Kelly's experience was no exception. It hurt, he says, when Princeton University's philosophy department turned down his tenure bid in 2004.

"I wondered if I'd have to leave the discipline," he says. "Maybe I wouldn't be able to be a philosopher."

But Mr. Kelly, who is 38, has bounced back, and in a big way. He has had offers of tenure from Harvard, Johns Hopkins, and Northwestern Universities, along with the Universities of Pennsylvania, Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Edinburgh, in Scotland. He said yes to Harvard, where he will start this fall.

How could a Princeton reject end up at Harvard? Brian R. Leiter, a philosopher and law professor at the University of Texas at Austin who runs a blog about the field, writes that such a thing would have been "unimaginable" just a generation ago. It reflects the widely different interests that have developed in individual philosophy departments, he says. What turns one off can make a candidate a good fit at another.

Daniel Garber, chairman of Princeton's department, says the university is "extremely cautious about tenuring from within." Mr. Kelly, he acknowledges, "is really good," and the decision to deny him was "controversial."

Mr. Kelly, who won a Guggenheim fellowship in 2003, says he chose Harvard because it will allow him to work in three broad areas: 19th- and 20th-century French and German philosophy, philosophy of mind, and, most unusually, cognitive science. Harvard has given Mr. Kelly the use of a 300-square-foot experimental laboratory, plus research assistants, for his work in visual perception.

Harvard also offered Mr. Kelly's wife, Cheryl K. Chen, a five-year lectureship in philosophy. Ms. Chen is giving up a tenure-track job at Bryn Mawr College to take the position. She was attracted to Harvard, she says, because the position will allow her to focus more on research. Besides, her father and grandmother live in the area, and she wanted to see more of them now that she and Mr. Kelly have a 22-month-old son.

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MOVING UP: Susan H. Fuhrman, dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, will become the next president of Columbia University's Teachers College. She will succeed Arthur Levine, the longtime president of the institution, who announced last fall that he would step down in July.

Ms. Fuhrman's maiden name, coincidentally, is Levine, and, like the current president, she grew up in the Bronx.

Ms. Fuhrman has led Penn's education school since 1995. She received a joint Ph.D. in political science and education from Columbia University and Teachers College in 1977. She taught politics and education at Teachers College before joining the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University at New Brunswick, from where Penn hired her.

Mr. Levine has presided over Teachers College for 12 years. In December he was named president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, in Princeton, N.J.

Last year he caused a stir when he released the first report in a four-part series on the state of education schools in the United States. The scathing assessment said university programs that prepare people for leadership posts in elementary and secondary education suffer from low admissions standards, weak faculties, and inappropriate degrees.

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NEW CHIEFS: Ann Weaver Hart, president of the University of New Hampshire, has been named the first female president of Temple University. She replaces David Adamany, who will step down in June. ... Alice P. Gast, vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has been appointed president of Lehigh University. She'll officially take over on August 1, replacing Gregory C. Farrington. ... Lester A. Lefton, provost at Tulane University and one of the administrators involved in reorganizing the university after Hurricane Katrina, will leave New Orleans this summer to become president of Kent State University. He will replace Carol A. Cartwright, who has held the job for 15 years.


College Transfer Rates Skyrocket
05/10/2006 - Voice of America (cir. )



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Latest Newscast News Now Live VOA Africa Live According to a study published by the U.S. Department of Education, as many as 60 percent of American college students attend more than one school before they graduate with a Bachelor's degree. The college transfer rate has been rising steadily for the last two decades, but in recent years, admissions officers have seen an explosion in transfer applications - and they say the reasons are clear. Miranda Spradlin, NYU studentMiranda Spradlin is a second-year student at New York University, where she is studying communications and public relations. She grew up in California, but says she decided to go to school in New York, because she wanted something different.

After just two months here, though, she started to feel that the move may have been a mistake. 'I just wasn't happy with NYU,' Spradlin says as she sits in a coffee shop after a morning of classes. 'Despite the fact that they don't have a campus, they said 'we make up for it; we're still a community; you see students all the time.' And I really didn't get that. I'd go out on the weekends, and I'd be with 30-year-old men at the bars that knew college girls were going to be there and stuff, and it just wasn't very appealing.' She stuck it out for the year, but when she found she still was not happy at the start of her second year at NYU, Miranda Spradlin decided to transfer. She has applied to three schools in the state of California's university system. 'They're much more social schools, much more community-oriented,' she says. 'I like the idea of having Greek Life (i.e. fraternities and soroed problems with their internal controls in 2004, but shaped up in 2005: The 264 companies that fell into this category saw an average share price gain of just 0.6% in the first year of the study, when problems came to light. Once the problems were fixed, they saw an average share-price gain of about 25%. The end result was that, over the two-year survey period, these companies saw an average share-price rise of 25.7%, just slightly below those that didn't have any problems and well above the broad market.

"The value of the increase in the internal controls more than offsets the outlay" required to comply with the contested rules, Mr. Benoit contends.


Research: Executive Summaries
05/01/2006 - Industrial Engineer (cir. 28,279)



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Joseph Hartman, associate professor, industrial and syst engineering, was mentioned in an article for Industrial Engineer magazine. For a complete view of the article, please click on the paperclip above.


Spring Admissions Watch .. "Most Difficult Year Ever"
05/01/2006 - College Bound News (cir. )



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In the State of Pennsylvania.
Applications at Delaware Valley College in Doylestown are up considerably over the last four years. The school had 1,728 apps and accepted 1,212 students. Lehigh U. applications are up 30 percent over the last five years. According to Eric Kaplan, dean, "Students who were admitted several years ago would have a more difficult time being admitted this year." And applications at Wilkes U. in Wilkes-Barre are up 9.4 percent. "We are not using a wait list," said Mike Frantz, vice president. "We assume that students have applied to more institutions, are not completing applications due to the ase of online applications and, as a result, yield to be down."


Slim Fast
05/01/2006 - Allure (cir. 1,016,324)



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Sally White, dean, college of education, was quoted in an article for Allure magazine. For a complete view of the article, please click on the paperclip above.

Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006

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