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Campus events highlights: Feb. 3-12

(All events are free unless otherwise noted.)

Friday, Feb. 3: “Interaction between Geological Carbon Storage and Subsurface Microbial Communities”
Saturday, Feb. 4: “What’s Our Name? The Names Controversy in Black History”
Tuesday, Feb. 7: “Learning Disorders: Interventions that Work”
Tuesday, Feb. 7: Michael Kimmel Lecture and Book Signing
Wednesday, Feb. 8: “New Approaches to C-F and C-C Bond Formation by Transition Metal Catalysis”
Wednesday, Feb. 8: “The Resilience of Royalty: Are Middle East Monarchies Immune to Revolution?”
Wednesday, Feb. 8: “Magic, Alchemy and the Jews in Greco-Roman Egypt”
Wednesday, Feb. 8: “Environmental Justice, Food Security, and Public Health”
Thursday, Feb. 9: “Why Mobilism Was Accepted in the mid-1960s”
Thursday, Feb. 9: “Developments in Paleomagnetism: Continental Drift, Paleolatitudes, Paleolongitudes”
Friday, Feb. 10: “Great Subduction Zone Earthquakes”
Friday, Feb. 10: “Plate Tectonics of the Antarctic Region”

Friday, Feb. 3: “Interaction between Geological Carbon Storage and Subsurface Microbial Communities”

The department of earth and environmental science presents an address by Matthew F. Kirk of the geochemistry department at Sandia National Laboratories.

The event begins at noon in STEPS 101.

Saturday, Feb. 4: “What’s Our Name? The Names Controversy in Black History”

The Sigal Museum of the Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society presents an address by William Scott, director of the Africana Studies program.

The event begins at 1 p.m. at the Sigal Museum, 342 Northampton St. in Easton. Admission is $5 for the talk and $7 for the talk and a museum visit.

Tuesday, Feb. 7: “Learning Disorders: Interventions that Work”

The College of Education presents a discussion featuring five renowned childhood learning disorder experts who will give examples of where response to intervention is working.

The event begins at 6 p.m. in Baker Hall of the Zoellner Arts Center.

Tuesday, Feb. 7: Michael Kimmel Lecture and Book Signing

The author of The Guys’ Guide to Feminism will deliver an address on men and masculinity at 7 p.m. in Sinclair Auditorium. The event is cosponsored by the Women’s Center, the Women’s Studies program, the Humanities Center, the Visiting Lecturers Program, and the departments of sociology and anthropology, history, and English.

Wednesday, Feb. 8: “New Approaches to C-F and C-C Bond Formation by Transition Metal Catalysis”

The department of chemistry presents an address by Abigail Doyle, assistant professor of chemistry at Princeton University.

The event begins at 4:10 p.m. in Neville Auditorium 3.

Wednesday, Feb. 8: “The Resilience of Royalty: Are Middle East Monarchies Immune to Revolution?”

The Center for Global Islamic Studies presents an address by Sean Yom, assistant professor of political science at Temple University.

The event begins at 4:15 p.m. in Room 480 of Maginnes Hall. It is cosponsored by the department of political science.

Wednesday, Feb. 8: “Magic, Alchemy and the Jews in Greco-Roman Egypt”

The Berman Center for Jewish Studies presents an address by Lynn LiDonnici, associate professor of religion at Vassar University.

The event begins at 4:15 p.m. in Room 102 of Maginnes Hall.

Wednesday, Feb. 8: “Environmental Justice, Food Security, and Public Health: A Future for Bethlehem”

The South Side Initiative and the City of Bethlehem present a Town Hall Lecture by Breena Holland, associate professor of political science.

The event begins at 7 p.m. at Bethlehem City Hall, 10 E. Church Street, Bethlehem.

Thursday, Friday, Feb. 9-10: “2012 Foster-Hewett Lectures”

The D. Foster Hewett (Lehigh, Class of 1902) Annual Lecture Series presents four addresses to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Alfred Wegener’s classic work on continental drift.

Thursday's lectures will be held in Sinclair Auditorium. At 4:30 p.m., Henry Frankel, professor of philosophy at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, will discuss “Why Mobilism Was Accepted in the mid-1960s.” At 5:45 p.m., Rob van der Voo, professor of geological sciences at the University of Michigan, will discuss “Developments in Paleomagnetism: Continental Drift, Paleolatitudes, Paleolongitudes.”

Friday's lectures will be held in STEPS 101. At noon, Rob McCaffrey, a research scientist in the department of geology at Portland State University, will discuss “Great Subduction Zone Earthquakes.” At 1:30 p.m., Joann Stock, professor of geology and geophysics at the California Institute of Technology, will discuss “Plate Tectonics of the Antarctic Region.”

The events are sponsored by the department of earth and environmental science and cosponsored by the department of history and the science, technology and society program.


Story by Kurt Pfitzer

Posted on Thursday, February 02, 2012

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