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University of San Francisco hires tech-savvy president
The University of San Francisco hired a new president who says he plans to strengthen connections between the Jesuit school and Silicon Valley. Father Paul J. Fitzgerald is senior vice president for academic affairs at Fairfield University in Connecticut, but he has Bay Area ties.

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College of Saint Rose named new president
The board of trustees of The College of Saint Rose in Albany announced the selection of Dr. Carolyn J. Stefanco to serve as the 11th president. Currently, Stefanco is vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, a position she has held since 2010.

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NYU gave president’s aspiring actor son apartment on campus
New York University’s controversial penchant under President John Sexton for doling out real-estate perks to top professors and executives also extended to his son. Jed Sexton, whose sole affiliation with NYU was his status as the president’s son, for years enjoyed a spacious faculty apartment while the university experienced a “severe” housing shortage.

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UIC faculty agrees to tentative contract
The University of Illinois at Chicago faculty union reached a tentative contract agreement with the campus administration, averting a strike that had been scheduled for next week. The union said the three-year deal, which covers the past two years and extends through August 2015, is better than the university’s last offer.

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Dartmouth President calls for end to high-risk, harmful behavior
Dartmouth’s President Phil Hanlon called for an end to high-risk and harmful behavior on campus that is hurting students, dividing the community, distracting the college from its core mission, and compromising its vision for the future.

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Targeting sexual assaults on campuses
After the past year saw a focused effort in Congress to address sexual assaults in the U.S. military — resulting in a host of sweeping reforms to protect and empower victims and hold perpetrators and commanders accountable — it's becoming clear that we may face similar systemic challenges on our college campuses.

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Lone Star College System honored for technology innovations
Lone Star College System was honored by the Center for Digital Education for its uses of technology to achieve first-rate student learning environments. LSCS received a top 10 ranking among community colleges with 10,000 or more students.
Pennington to lead Ohio University-Southern
J. Nicole Pennington, director of the nursing program at Ohio University-Southern, has been named the fourth dean in the history of the regional campus of Ohio University. "I'm excited to take on the new challenges of running the Southern campus," Pennington said after her appointment was announced.

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Is there a sustainable MOOC business model?
If last year was a tough one for MOOCs and their various stakeholders—the platform companies, faculty members and sundry market cheerleaders—it can only have been a consequence of the absurd expectations for MOOCs, both as an agent of change and as a harbinger of educational doom.

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Inside sales can improve results more quickly with Noble
Noble for Sales Cloud provides integration between the Noble Enterprise contact center platform and the world’s leading enterprise cloud computing and CRM platform, allowing inside sales departments to generate more contacts and achieve improved efficiency and productivity.

 

Claire McCaskill to Quiz Colleges on How They Handle Sexual Assault Cases (BuzzFeed.com)
Sen. Claire McCaskill sent an exhaustive survey to 350 colleges and universities this week in hopes of better understanding how schools report and investigate sexual assault and whether or not current federal oversight is effective. The congressional inquiry is unprecedented in terms of scope and specificity, she says -- and also in line with her recent strategy for tackling sexual assault in the military.
Why the Trillion-Dollar College Debt Burden Is Still Rising (Al Jazeera America)
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ran the numbers on what the student loan rate increases will mean for students, and found that, for loans issued in the 2014–15 school year, monthly payments would rise about $3 a month for every $5,000 in loan balance. That figure may sound trivial, but the average student taking out loans in 2012 carried $29,400 in debt after graduation.
Dartmouth President Calls for End to Extreme Behavior That Mars Image of Elite College (Washington Post)
Dartmouth College's president lamented Wednesday that the Ivy League school's promising future "is being hijacked by extreme behavior," including sex assaults, parties with "racist and sexist undertones," and a campus culture in which "dangerous drinking has become the rule and not the exception."Philip J. Hanlon, a Dartmouth alumnus who took office in June, said such problems were taking a toll on the image of the 245-year-old college in Hanover, N.H.
Fault Lines Appear at Northwestern Over Union Vote (New York Times)
The imminent vote by scholarship football players at Northwestern on whether to certify a union has students, professors and athletes in other sports choosing sides. The varied viewpoints were on display at a meeting on Wednesday night organized by former Northwestern football players at a civic center here. Several dozen alumni attended, most of them former football players.
Excelencia in Education Report Reveals Latino College Completion Strides and Struggles (Diverse)
Despite California having the largest Latino population in the U.S., there are no California higher education institutions in the top five at the associate's or bachelor's level, according to a report delivered Tuesday on Capitol Hill. Excelencia in Education also noted in its report "Latino College Completion: United States" that Latinos will need to earn 5.5 million more degrees above current levels by 2020 in order for the U.S. to regain the top ranking in the world for college degree attainment.
Udacity Will No Longer Offer Free Certificates (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Udacity hopes the certificates it offers to people who complete its massive open online courses are worth something. Now the company plans to charge students accordingly. The company, one of the big three MOOC providers, said on Wednesday that it would no longer give learners the opportunity to earn free, "non-identity-verified" certificates.
U.S. Graduate Schools Wonder if India Is Their New Engine of Enrollment Growth (Chronicle of Higher Education)
International graduate-student trends appear to have hit a reset. For the second year in a row, applications to American graduate schools from India skyrocketed, while those from prospective Chinese students fell.
Lawmakers Back Tennessee Promise Plan for Free Tuition (Tennessean)
Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to provide free community college received the overwhelming endorsement of state lawmakers Tuesday night, passing the House of Representatives on an 87-8 vote. The House joined the Senate in approving "Tennessee Promise," the plan Haslam laid out in February to cover the full cost of two-year college for every high school graduate starting in fall 2015.
Taking Stock: Do MOOCs Work Best For Educated People? (KQED, Mind/Shift - Blog)
After just a few years, an explosion of interest, a lot of criticism and some iteration, the MOOC craze has recently come under close scrutiny. A recent University of Pennsylvania study of the 16 courses that the university offered through Coursera indicates that classes with thousands of students may not close the college gap as quickly as some champions had hoped.
Is College Worth It? (Economist - Opinion Piece)
College graduates aged 25 to 32 who are working full time earn about $17,500 more annually than their peers who have only a high school diploma, according to the Pew Research Centre, a think-tank. But not all degrees are equally useful. And given how much they cost--a residential four-year degree can set you back as much as $60,000 a year--many students end up worse off than if they had started working at 18.