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Rethinking Education: A New Michael Wesch Video

Since 2007, Michael Wesch, a Kansas State University anthropologist, has released a series of viral videos interrogating the ways in which new web technologies shape human communication and interactions with information.Now he’s back with a new video called “Rethinking Education,” a montage that pulls together sound bites of thought leaders (Tim O’Reilly, Yochai Benkler, Brewster Kahle, Ray Kurzweil, etc.) describing how technology is altering the broader educational landscape.

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AMX Names 2011 Innovation Award Winners at EduComm

AMX, a provider of solutions that simplify the implementation, maintenance, and use of technology to create effective environments, announced the winners of the 2011 AMX Innovation Awards at EduComm. The awards, established with the University Business Leadership Institute, recognize individuals and institutions of the AMX Education Alliance transforming higher education around the world through innovative accomplishment and practices. This year’s three winning institutions were selected from among over 500 nominations around the globe.

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How the Internet Is Revolutionizing Education

Unless there's an outright ban, it's almost impossible to find a classroom anywhere in the United States without at least one computer. And in many college lecture halls, nearly every student will come ready with a laptop or tablet. At the very least, they often have a smartphone that's Internet-ready. These tools, only recently available to a mass audience (relatively speaking), are fundamentally altering education. They allow students to access vast stores of information with the press of a button.

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How to Reverse U.S. Economic Malaise

U.S. unemployment remains high at 9.1 percent (FT) and expectations are grim for creating sustainable job opportunities. But while it is "probably going to stay high for a fairly long time," public sector investment in education, technology, and infrastructure are a way to tackle unemployment by addressing longstanding structural problems on "the tradable side of the economy," says Nobel Prize-winning economist A. Michael Spence.

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Oracle seeks billions in lawsuit against Google

Oracle Corp is seeking damages "in the billions of dollars" from Google Inc in a patent lawsuit over the smartphone market, according to a court filing.

Oracle sued Google last year, claiming the Web search company's Android mobile operating technology infringes Oracle's Java patents. Oracle bought the Java programming language through its acquisition of Sun Microsystems in January 2010.

Some see the lawsuit as a sign of a growing business rivalry between the two companies.

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IBM Celebrates a Century in Business

Google, Apple and Facebook get all the attention. But the forgettable everyday tasks of technology - saving a file on your laptop, swiping your ATM card to get 40 bucks, scanning a gallon of milk at the checkout line - that's all IBM.

International Business Machines turned 100 on Thursday without much fanfare. But its much younger competitors owe a lot to Big Blue.

After all, where would Groupon be without the supermarket bar code? Or Google without the mainframe computer?

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Benchmark Your Technology Progress On Campus

Find out how well your educational institution is using technology to meet your educational objectives. The survey measures progress in the implementation of anytime/anywhere access, differentiated learning, 21st Century tools, assessment tools and enterprise support.

Take the 10-minute Survey to see your campus progress toward achieving this Vision at  http://www.siia.net/visionk20/survey/survey.asp?ID=EduComm

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How the Internet is Revolutionizing Education

By 2019, it’s estimated that 50% of classes taught will be delivered online, with 75% of public higher education institutions reporting having online learning in their plans. These stats and more are included in an infographic put together by OnlineEducation.net, which provides a comprehensive resource to help current and prospect students learn about all the education opportunities available to them.

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Report: Tuition Is Soaring At Two-Year Colleges

Rising tuition costs at two-year colleges are outpacing increases in household incomes across the country, making it difficult for students to get bachelor's degrees, according to a report released today.

The contrast is especially stark in Virginia, according to the report from the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. From 1999 to 2009, median household income, adjusted for inflation, rose 6 percent statewide while tuition at public two-year colleges increased 94.4 percent.

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Culinary College Weighing Merger Or Appeal To Avoid Closing

Baltimore International College is exploring possible mergers with other institutions and weighing a possible appeal in its attempts to forestall closing because of lost accreditation, the college's Board of Trustees announced Thursday afternoon.

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The Supreme Court Ruling and Christian Colleges (Inside Higher Ed)
Friday's Supreme Court decision that states must authorize and recognize gay and lesbian marriages could create major legal challenges for religious colleges -- primarily evangelical Christian colleges that bar same-sex relationships among students and faculty members. Or the decision may not create much of a legal challenge at all. Or it may create challenges, but not soon. Legal experts are divided. But the question of whether same-sex marriage as a national right changes the legal status of Christian colleges is no longer just theoretical.
Higher Education Reform Should Start with For-profit Schools - Opinion (Al Jazeera America)
Alexis Goldstein & Luke Herrine write: As the presidential campaign season heats up, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are talking about debt-free or tuition-free college. Using student debt as an issue to damage Republicans and to energize young voters is a smart strategy. But to make the case for why higher education should be free in the United States, 2016 candidates need look no further than the current crisis in the for-profit college industry. The government's deep conflicts of interest as both the regulator meant to protect students and the banker profiting off student debt has led to an unmitigated disaster -- one that, so far, has stuck students with the bill.
Why Is It So Hard to Kill a College? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As Sweet Briar College's projected demise and unexpected revival illustrate, small colleges are a resilient bunch. There are about 1,600 private, nonprofit four-year colleges in the United States, but only a handful close each year. In 2012, the most recent year for which data are available from the National Center for Education Statistics, just two of those institutions shut down.
How to Cut Student Drinking (Wall Street Journal)
Multiple studies have found that giving students personalized feedback about their drinking habits via the Web or by text can lead them to cut back. The technique mimics in-person interventions, which have been shown in studies to reduce drinking as much as 13%, but because the communication is delivered electronically, it can reach more students at lower cost.
Match Made on Facebook: More College Freshmen Choose Their Own Roommates (NBC News)
College-bound students across the country are putting themselves out there. They're not looking for love; they're picking who they're going to room with during their freshman year in an increasingly popular process known as roommate self-selection. While the majority of schools still assign roommates, either randomly or based on answers to questionnaires, many are empowering incoming freshmen to find their own through Facebook, apps, and housing software.
Sweet Briar Second Chance - Editorial (Wall Street Journal)
The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board writes: There will be more Sweet Briars. The liberal arts market is saturated with some 600 schools, and institutions lacking famous names or large endowments are vulnerable--unless they tame costs and increase the value of the degree. The loyalty of its graduates is admirable, but Sweet Briar won't survive if it returns to business as usual. In that case Virginia courts and policy makers are unlikely to entertain more legal howling. Meantime, similar colleges can heed the message to change or die.
Washington University Touts Projected Increase in Diversity (Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO)
After taking a public relations beating over its lack of diversity last year, Washington University reported Friday that its incoming freshman class will be one of its most diverse in years. While the university expects to welcome more Hispanic and low-income students this fall, the biggest projected jump is in the percentage of black freshmen expected to enroll -- 9 percent, up from 5 percent of 2014's freshman class. The number of Hispanic freshmen is expected to jump to 8 percent, up from 6 percent last year. That means that if projections hold, 18 percent this fall's freshman class would be either black or Hispanic. The projected jump in low-income students -- 11 percent up from 8 percent -- puts the university on track to meet its goal of a campus where 13 percent of students come from low-income backgrounds by 2020.
Drexel University Implements New Mental Health Kiosk (USA Today: College)
Walking through the Drexel University Recreation Center, I couldn't even spot it at first. In fact, I walked by it multiple times. I just didn't expect a kiosk that screens for mental illness to look like a sleek version of an ATM. The sign next to the kiosk read, "Get a Check-Up From the Neck Up," so I pressed "Take A Screening" to start the process. The two-minute anonymous screening can test for six different signs of mental health problems: depression, generalized anxiety, bipolar, post-traumatic stress, eating and alcohol-use disorders.
Degree on Their Own Time (Inside Higher Ed)
One women's college is making sure that all students who want a degree can earn one. Alverno College, an all-women's institution in Wisconsin, is phasing out its once popular weekend courses in favor of a hybrid option for students, a move the college's president said will allow the student body to better balance personal and professional demands while still pursuing a degree.
Supreme Court Will Re-Hear Texas Affirmative Action Case (Associated Press)
The Supreme Court says it will dive back into the fight over the use of race in admissions at the University of Texas, a decision that presages tighter limits on affirmative action in higher education.