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Rethinking Education: A New Michael Wesch Video

Since 2007, Michael Wesch, a Kansas State University anthropologist, has released a series of viral videos interrogating the ways in which new web technologies shape human communication and interactions with information.Now he’s back with a new video called “Rethinking Education,” a montage that pulls together sound bites of thought leaders (Tim O’Reilly, Yochai Benkler, Brewster Kahle, Ray Kurzweil, etc.) describing how technology is altering the broader educational landscape.

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AMX Names 2011 Innovation Award Winners at EduComm

AMX, a provider of solutions that simplify the implementation, maintenance, and use of technology to create effective environments, announced the winners of the 2011 AMX Innovation Awards at EduComm. The awards, established with the University Business Leadership Institute, recognize individuals and institutions of the AMX Education Alliance transforming higher education around the world through innovative accomplishment and practices. This year’s three winning institutions were selected from among over 500 nominations around the globe.

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How the Internet Is Revolutionizing Education

Unless there's an outright ban, it's almost impossible to find a classroom anywhere in the United States without at least one computer. And in many college lecture halls, nearly every student will come ready with a laptop or tablet. At the very least, they often have a smartphone that's Internet-ready. These tools, only recently available to a mass audience (relatively speaking), are fundamentally altering education. They allow students to access vast stores of information with the press of a button.

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How to Reverse U.S. Economic Malaise

U.S. unemployment remains high at 9.1 percent (FT) and expectations are grim for creating sustainable job opportunities. But while it is "probably going to stay high for a fairly long time," public sector investment in education, technology, and infrastructure are a way to tackle unemployment by addressing longstanding structural problems on "the tradable side of the economy," says Nobel Prize-winning economist A. Michael Spence.

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Oracle seeks billions in lawsuit against Google

Oracle Corp is seeking damages "in the billions of dollars" from Google Inc in a patent lawsuit over the smartphone market, according to a court filing.

Oracle sued Google last year, claiming the Web search company's Android mobile operating technology infringes Oracle's Java patents. Oracle bought the Java programming language through its acquisition of Sun Microsystems in January 2010.

Some see the lawsuit as a sign of a growing business rivalry between the two companies.

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IBM Celebrates a Century in Business

Google, Apple and Facebook get all the attention. But the forgettable everyday tasks of technology - saving a file on your laptop, swiping your ATM card to get 40 bucks, scanning a gallon of milk at the checkout line - that's all IBM.

International Business Machines turned 100 on Thursday without much fanfare. But its much younger competitors owe a lot to Big Blue.

After all, where would Groupon be without the supermarket bar code? Or Google without the mainframe computer?

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Benchmark Your Technology Progress On Campus

Find out how well your educational institution is using technology to meet your educational objectives. The survey measures progress in the implementation of anytime/anywhere access, differentiated learning, 21st Century tools, assessment tools and enterprise support.

Take the 10-minute Survey to see your campus progress toward achieving this Vision at  http://www.siia.net/visionk20/survey/survey.asp?ID=EduComm

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How the Internet is Revolutionizing Education

By 2019, it’s estimated that 50% of classes taught will be delivered online, with 75% of public higher education institutions reporting having online learning in their plans. These stats and more are included in an infographic put together by OnlineEducation.net, which provides a comprehensive resource to help current and prospect students learn about all the education opportunities available to them.

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Report: Tuition Is Soaring At Two-Year Colleges

Rising tuition costs at two-year colleges are outpacing increases in household incomes across the country, making it difficult for students to get bachelor's degrees, according to a report released today.

The contrast is especially stark in Virginia, according to the report from the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. From 1999 to 2009, median household income, adjusted for inflation, rose 6 percent statewide while tuition at public two-year colleges increased 94.4 percent.

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Culinary College Weighing Merger Or Appeal To Avoid Closing

Baltimore International College is exploring possible mergers with other institutions and weighing a possible appeal in its attempts to forestall closing because of lost accreditation, the college's Board of Trustees announced Thursday afternoon.

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As Ebola Fears Touch Campuses, Officials Respond with an Excess of Caution (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Colleges across the country faced Ebola scares this week that sent at least one graduate student to the hospital, several employees into quarantine, and untold numbers of students into an unnecessary panic. On the one hand, they want to take extra precautions when there is even a remote chance Ebola might find its way onto their campuses. On the other hand, they're trying to avoid what a University of Wisconsin epidemiologist called "hysterical reactions that are not based on science."
85 Colleges Are Now Under Federal Investigation for Sexual Assault Cases (Huffington Post)
Eighty-five higher education institutions are now under investigation due to concerns with how the schools handle sexual violence on campus, the U.S. Department of Education told The Huffington Post on Wednesday. Of the current investigations, 55 began in 2014 and nine were added in the past two months. The Education Department began publicly disclosing its Office for Civil Rights investigations of colleges for sexual violence in May, when the overall total was 55.
Health and Education - Commentary (Forbes)
Forbes Contributor John C. Goodman writes: What does our health care system have in common with our system of higher education' A lot more than you might think. In both systems a third-party payer pays a good portion of the bill, leaving consumers and producers with perverse incentives to take advantage of it. The financing of both systems is dysfunctional. There is much waste and inefficiency. And low-income families are the least well served.
Like Other Colleges, Fredonia Forges Ahead with New Science Facility (Buffalo News)
Public and private colleges in Western New York have spent more than $180 million in recent years on new homes for math, science and technology.
A New Kind of Rating System - Presidential Opinion (Inside Higher Ed)
Paul J. LeBlanc, President, Southern New Hampshire University writes: Many of my fellow college presidents remain worried about the Obama Administration's proposed (and still being developed) rating system for higher education. While Education Department officials have been responsive and thoughtful about our concerns, many among us fundamentally do not trust government to get this right. Or anyone, for that matter. After all, we already have lots of rating systems and they mostly seem flawed.
Why Colleges Do Not Want to Be Judged by Their Graduation Rates (Chronicle of Higher Education)
This fall, President Obama will release a college-rating system that is likely to include graduation rates as a key measure of institutional success. That worries colleges, which have long complained that the official government figures leave out many successful graduates. The federal rate counts only first-time, full-time students who graduate within a certain time frame. Look at the Education Department's first Beginning Postsecondary Students longitudinal study, begun in 2003, and you'll see several categories of students that the federal rate overlooks.
Let Us Fix It: How We Pay for College Is Broken - Commentary (LinkedIn)
Jeff Selingo writes: Fewer people are actually going to college today compared to just a few years ago. Enrollment has dropped by nearly a million students since 2011. Only 4 out of every 10 young Americans were enrolled in college in last fall. The big problem, of course, is the rising price of college. In 2012, the average college-tuition bill ate up more than 40 percent of median earnings in the United States. In 2001, it accounted for less than a quarter of a family's paycheck.
Tuition Freeze: N.J. Assembly Passes 7 Bills on Higher Education (New Jersey Advance Media)
A New Jersey bill that would force all 4-year colleges (including private non-profit schools) in New Jersey to guarantee tuition for 9 semesters has moved one step closer to becoming law. The state Assembly today voted 48-21 to pass the bill, which was one of seven bills the lower house passed today that are intended to rein in college costs.
Jobs for Humanities, Arts Grads (Inside Higher Ed)
Two reports on outcomes for humanities majors could serve to reinforce two disparate beliefs about the field: one where they are seen as a viable path to a successful career, and another where they are seen as a track to a low income and few job prospects. On average, humanities majors do earn less than graduates in many other disciplines, according to the report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. But that doesn't mean they are starving artists or underemployed baristas.
The Reluctant Pragmatist (Inside Higher Ed)
The liberal arts have long been subject to criticism and even ridicule from those who don't see their immediate value; the debate over utilitarian versus broad education is ancient. But there's something particularly pernicious about the current climate, it seems, with threats to funding models for such programs in some states, for example. So how do advocates respond' Do they continue to extol the intrinsic virtues of the liberal arts or do they adopt the opposition's rhetoric, making a case for their usefulness'